In August 2009, Robert Khuzami, the SEC’s Director of the Division of Enforcement, announced that the SEC will be creating five “national specialized units dedicated to particular highly specialized and complex areas of securities law” – including an FCPA unit. (see here).

Khuzami also announced that the SEC was working on other initiatives of interest to FCPA followers including creation of “a public policy statement that will set forth standards to evaluate cooperation by individuals in enforcement actions” as well as “recommend[ation] to the Commission that the SEC enter into Deferred Prosecution Agreements, in which the [Division of Enforcement] agree[s] in the appropriate case to forego an enforcement action against an individual or entity subject to certain terms, including full cooperation, a waiver of statutes of limitations, and compliance with certain undertakings.”

Yesterday, there were developments on each of these issues.

First, the SEC (see here) announced that Cheryl J. Scarboro will lead the FCPA unit. As indicated in the release, Scarboro is an SEC veteran having served as Associate Director, Assistant Director, Deputy Assistant Director, and Staff Attorney in the Division of Enforcement. For many years, Scarboro has been a primary SEC voice on FCPA issues and an active participant at many FCPA conferences.

Second, the SEC (see here) announced a series of measures “to further strengthen its enforcement program by encouraging greater cooperation from individuals and companies in the agency’s investigations and enforcement actions.”

“New cooperation tools” not previously available to the SEC, will now include, among other things:

* “Cooperation Agreements — Formal written agreements in which the Enforcement Division agrees to recommend to the Commission that a cooperator receive credit for cooperating in investigations or related enforcement actions if the cooperator provides substantial assistance such as full and truthful information and testimony.”

* “Deferred Prosecution Agreements — Formal written agreements in which the Commission agrees to forego an enforcement action against a cooperator if the individual or company agrees, among other things, to cooperate fully and truthfully and to comply with express prohibitions and undertakings during a period of deferred prosecution.”

and

* “Non-prosecution Agreements — Formal written agreements, entered into under limited and appropriate circumstances, in which the Commission agrees not to pursue an enforcement action against a cooperator if the individual or company agrees, among other things, to cooperate fully and truthfully and comply with express undertakings.”

The SEC release notes that “similar cooperation tools have been regularly and successfully used by the Justice Department in its criminal investigations and prosecutions.”

More details about these measures can be found in a revised and newly issued version of the SEC’s enforcement manual beginning at pg. 119 (see here).

The SEC news conference announcing these appointments and initiatives is available on the SEC’s website.

While not FCPA specific, these measures as applied to FCPA enforcement are likely to lead to even less judicial scrutiny (not that there is much judicial scrutiny at present) as to SEC interpretations of the FCPA and as to whether factual evidence actually exists to support each element of an FCPA charge.

In fact, as set forth in the manual (p. 130) “[a]n admission or an agreement not to contest the relevant facts underlying the alleged offenses” is a key factor the SEC will consider in determining whether a company should receive a deferred prosecution agreement.

For those anxious to see FCPA enforcement actions contested in an open, transparent, and adversary proceeding, yesterday’s announcements will be a blow as I expect FCPA enforcement to become even more opaque in the future.

Stay tuned as much is surely to be written about these new measures in the coming weeks and months.