Archive for the ‘FCPA Inc.’ Category

A Comprehensive FCPA Resource

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014

The question was recently asked: ”will there ever be a classic treatise on the FCPA?”New Era

According to Webster’s, a treatise is a book, article, etc., that discusses a subject carefully and thoroughly.

With that definition in mind, I invite you to consider my new book “The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in a New Era.”  Inside you will find:

  • A thorough telling of the story of the FCPA told largely through original voices of actual participants who shaped the pioneering law;
  • Foundational knowledge (such as DOJ and SEC policy and resolution vehicles and the realities of the global marketplace) that best enhance understanding and comprehension of specific FCPA topics;
  • A comprehensive analysis of the FCPA’s anti-bribery provisions and for each element, exception or affirmative defense discussion of all legal sources of authority (including all relevant substantive FCPA judicial decisions) as well as non-legal sources of information (including discussion of over 70 FCPA enforcement actions);
  • Discussion of other legal issues also relevant to FCPA enforcement;
  • A comprehensive analysis of the FCPA’s books and records and internal controls provisions including legal authority as well as non-legal sources of information;
  • Analysis of the typical origins of FCPA scrutiny and enforcement;
  • Discussion of FCPA settlement amounts, how they are calculated, and analysis of legal and policy issues relevant to settlement amounts;
  • Discussion of FCPA sentencing issues, how sentences are calculated, and an analysis of legal and policy issues relevant to sentencing decisions;
  • An extended discussion and analysis of an often overlooked topics, “FCPA Ripples,” and how settlement amounts in an actual FCPA enforcement action are often only a relatively minor component of the overall financial consequences that can result from FCPA scrutiny or enforcement;
  • An exploration of practical and provocative reasons for the general increase in FCPA enforcement during this new era including a discussion of FCPA Inc. and the business of bribery;
  • Identification and discussion of FCPA compliance best practices and benchmarking metrics; and
  • An in-depth discussion and analysis of FCPA reform designed to ensure that the FCPA is best achieving the original goals of the law and that FCPA enforcement is transparent and consistent with rule of law principles.

Whether the above topics highlighted and explored in “The FCPA in a New Era” make it a classic treatise, well, I invite you to come to your own conclusion.  At the very least, you will have to agree that the cover of the book is more inviting than a typical treatise.

While I am certainly not going to ascribe labels to my own work, I am pleased to share what others have said about “The FCPA In a New Era.”

Michael Mukasey, former U.S. Attorney General

“Professor Koehler has brought to this volume the clear-eyed perspective that has made his FCPA Professor website the most authoritative source for those seeking to understand and apply the FCPA. This is a uniquely useful book, laying out systematically the history and rationale of the FCPA, as well as its evolution into a structure governed as much by lore as by law. It will be valuable both to those who counsel international corporations, whether in connection with immediate crises or long-term strategies; and to those who contemplate what the FCPA has become, and how it can be improved.”

Professor Daniel Chow, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law

“This is the single most comprehensive academic treatment of the Foreign Corrupt Practices available. Professor Koehler’s book will become the authoritative standard for the field. The book not only treats the history of the FCPA, but analyzes the statute’s elements in detail, discusses current cases, and makes proposals for reforms where the current law is deficient. The book is written in a clear, accessible style and I will use it often as a resource for my own scholarly work.”

 Richard Alderman, former Director of the UK Serious Fraud Office

“An excellent and thought-provoking book by a great expert. Backed up by rigorous analysis of cases, Professor Koehler constantly challenges those involved in anti-corruption work by asking the question ‘why?’ He puts forward many constructive and well-argued suggestions for improvements that need to be considered. I have learned a lot from Professor Koehler over the years and I can thoroughly recommend this book.”

Thomas Fox, FCPA Compliance and Ethics Blog and FCPA Practitioner

“The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in a New Era” should become one of the standard texts for any FCPA compliance practitioner, law student studying the FCPA or anyone else interested in anti-bribery and anti-corruption. It should be on your FCPA library bookshelf.”

Barry Vitou, thebriberyact.com and Compliance Practitioner

“If you only read one book on the US FCPA, read this one. [...] Mike Koehler’s new book is probably the best book we’ve read about the FCPA. [...] For those wanting a pair of ‘FCPA goggles’ no book is, in our opinion, better.”

To order a hard copy of the book, see here and here; to order an e-copy of the book, see here and here.

For media coverage of the book including Q&A’s, see here from Corporate Counsel, here from Global Investigations Review, and here from Corporate Counsel Weekly.

*****

Looking for even more information and analysis of the FCPA and FCPA enforcement?

I invite you to all also consider the following year in review articles.  Granted the below articles are not found between two covers, but you will find approximately 500 pages of FCPA statistics, trends and analysis over time.

For 2013, see here.

For 2012, see here.

For 2011, see here.

For 2010, see here.

For 2009, see here.

The Selling Of FCPA Enforcement Attorneys Needs To Stop!

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

StopSignFor profit companies that host FCPA conferences are entitled to run their business as they see fit.

However, when for profit companies use Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement attorneys at the DOJ and SEC like commodities that are then marketed and sold to the public, this is where the line needs to be drawn.

A common marketing device the conference companies use in hopes of driving attendance to their events is by touting the public officials who will speak at the event. The marketing materials highlight the DOJ and SEC officials as keynote speakers.  Participants are told they are going to have a “Conversation with DOJ and SEC Prosecutors.”

One e-mail I recently received attempted to entice me as follows.

Come for the DOJ and SEC, Stay for the Rest…

“With 12 senior level DOJ and SEC officials providing invaluable insights into the latest enforcement initiatives, there is so much more to [the conference next month]“

Another recent e-mail from the same conference company had the following subject matter line:  ”Join the DOJ, SEC, Over 500 Anticorruption Professionals Next Month in DC.”

Another recent e-mail from the same company concerning a separate event stated “gain first-hand insights from US DOJ, SEC and the IRS on the priorities and approaches to building a successful case.”  The more formal marketing material from the conference company profiled DOJ, SEC and IRS officials as “featured speakers” and described the enforcement officials’ panel as an “exclusive” session.

Exclusive is right because the general public is not invited.

Rather, to hear your public officials speak about an important law you will have to pony up (approximately $2,500 – $4,000 dollars depending on the package you choice and when you register).

The selling of FCPA enforcement attorneys by private companies needs to stop.

FCPA enforcement attorneys are public officials, not a commodity that a for-profit company should be allowed to sell.

It is is bit ironic that these conferences focus on FCPA topics, yet are not the speaking slots a thing of value that the conference companies provide to public officials in an effort to obtain more business?  Not a clear parallel to be sure, but an issue to nevertheless ponder.  Why do the FCPA enforcement attorneys at the DOJ and SEC allow themselves to be used as pawns by for profit companies?  After the FCPA Guidance is there really a need for the enforcement officials to hit the FCPA conference circuit as frequently as they do?

These are serious questions that deserve more attention.

On final point – conference participants are lead to believe by the conference firm marketing literature that they are going to hear unique insight into DOJ or SEC enforcement policy and procedures.  The reality is the first words out of the mouth of the DOJ or SEC officials will usually be something to the effect that they are speaking in their individual capacity and that nothing they say represents official DOJ or SEC policy or binds the DOJ or SEC.

For previous posts on the above (and to see how this practice has NOT stopped) see here and here.

Friday Roundup

Friday, October 17th, 2014

Strange definitions, asset recovery, through the revolving door, and proof.  It’s all here in the Friday roundup.

Strange Definitions

The Department of Justice and Securities and Exchange Commission sure do have some strange definitions.

For instance, in this Global Investigations Review Q&A, Marshall Miller (Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General) states:

“[W]ith respect to declinations, if we have good reason to investigate potential criminal conduct then we’re going to follow that investigation to its end. At times, we do decline to prosecute, and we do so in an appropriate and expeditious way. One of the things we’ve been talking about is how to ensure that those under investigation understand why and when we decline to prosecute. But primarily these are cases where there were significant indicia of wrongdoing, but the wrongdoing doesn’t add up to a federal criminal case and [these] are not examples of the Justice Department just charging into corporations where there’s no wrongdoing in the first place.”

When the wrongdoing under investigation “doesn’t add up to a federal criminal case” that is not a declination, it is what the law commands.

Over at the SEC, yesterday the agency touted its FY 2014 enforcement actions (see here).  Andrew Ceresney (Director of the SEC’s Division of Enforcement) stated:  “I am proud of our excellent record of success and look forward to another year filled with high-impact enforcement actions.”

Included in the SEC’s release is the following:

“Combatting Foreign Corrupt Practices and Obtaining Highest-Ever Penalties Against Individuals

With the exception of Weatherford all of the corporate enforcement actions were resolved through the SEC’s own administrative process wherein it needs to convince only itself of the strength of its case.  In addition, see here for the article “Why You Should Be Alarmed by the ADM FCPA Enforcement Action” and see here for the post “HP Enforcement Action-Where to Begin.”

As to that “excellent record of success,” in the former Siemens executives action, see here for the previous guest post by a former Assistant Director of the SEC’s Enforcement Division (“Sometimes you see something in a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act case that’s so inexplicable you wish someone would throw the red challenge flag and have the play reviewed under the hood or up in the booth.  Unfortunately, in the largely-overlooked wind-down phase of the SEC’s FCPA case against several former Siemens executives, the last of the defendants defaulted, so nobody was around to throw the challenge flag – and as a result the SEC seems to have gotten away with a doozy of a blown call.”).

Asset Recovery

Relevant to the DOJ’s Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Initiative under which prosecutors in the DOJ Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Section work in partnership with federal law enforcement agencies to forfeit the proceeds of foreign official corruption, the DOJ recently announced:

“[A] settlement of its civil forfeiture cases against assets in the United States owned by the Second Vice President of the Republic of Equatorial Guinea Teodoro Nguema Obiang Mangue that he purchased with the proceeds of corruption.”

“Through relentless embezzlement and extortion, Vice President Nguema Obiang shamelessly looted his government and shook down businesses in his country to support his lavish lifestyle, while many of his fellow citizens lived in extreme poverty,” said Assistant Attorney General Caldwell.  “After raking in millions in bribes and kickbacks, Nguema Obiang embarked on a corruption-fueled spending spree in the United States.  This settlement forces Nguema Obiang to relinquish assets worth an estimated $30 million, and prevents Nguema Obiang from hiding other stolen money in the United States, fulfilling the goals of our Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Initiative: to deny safe haven to the proceeds of large-scale foreign official corruption and recover those funds for the people harmed by the abuse of office.”

“While this settlement is certainly gratifying for the many investigators and prosecutors who worked tirelessly to bring it to fruition, it is undoubtedly even more rewarding for the people of Equatorial Guinea, knowing that at least some of the money plundered from their country’s coffers is being returned to them,” said Acting ICE Director Winkowski.  “ICE remains steadfast in its resolve to combat foreign corruption when the spoils of these crimes come to our shores and we are committed to seeking justice and compensation for the often impoverished victims.”

According to court documents, Nguema Obiang, the son of Equatorial Guinea’s President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo, received an official government salary of less than $100,000 but used his position and influence as a government minister to amass more than $300 million worth of assets through corruption and money laundering, in violation of both Equatoguinean and U.S. law.  Through intermediaries and corporate entities, Nguema Obiang acquired numerous assets in the United States that he is agreeing to relinquish in a combination of forfeiture and divestment to a charity for the benefit of the people of Equatorial Guinea.

Under the terms of the settlement, Nguema Obiang must sell a $30 million mansion located in Malibu, California, a Ferrari automobile and various items of Michael Jackson memorabilia purchased with the proceeds of corruption.  Of those proceeds, $20 million will be given to a charitable organization to be used for the benefit of the people of Equatorial Guinea.  Another $10.3 million will be forfeited to the United States and will be used for the benefit of the people of Equatorial Guinea to the extent permitted by law.

Under the agreement, Nguema Obiang must also disclose and remove other assets he owns in the United States.  Nguema Obiang must also make a $1 million payment to the United States, representing the value of Michael Jackson memorabilia already removed from the United States for disbursement to the charitable organization.  The agreement also provides that if certain of Nguema Obiang’s other assets, including a Gulfstream Jet, are ever brought into the United States, they are subject to seizure and forfeiture.”

Related to the above action, the Wall Street Journal recently published this article titled “When U.S. Targets Foreign Leaders for Corruption, Recovering Loot Is a Challenge.”  The article notes:

“The [Obiang] settlement shows the ups and downs of the Justice Department’s Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Initiative, announced in 2010. So far, the agency has collected about $600 million out of the $1.2 billion pursued from 15 cases against current or former officials and businessmen in at least 14 different countries, according to a review of the cases by the Journal. Most of the cases involve alleged bribery, extortion or embezzlement. Justice Department officials said additional cases haven’t been made public yet because their court filings are sealed.

[...]

“I am pleased to be able to end this long and costly ordeal,” Mr. Obiang wrote in a statement on his Facebook page. “I agreed to settle this case despite the fact that the U.S. federal courts had consistently found that the Department of Justice lacked probable cause to seize my property.” Lawyers for Mr. Obiang have said the disputed property was bought with money earned legally through timber concessions and companies he owns. The Justice Department faced daunting obstacles in its fight against Mr. Obiang that are common in corruption cases against foreign leaders. To win in court, the government must prove that assets in the U.S. were bought with proceeds of illegal activity in the country where the alleged corruption occurred. The money trail is even harder to follow when the target has a large number of overseas shell companies and accounts, as Mr. Obiang did, according to court filings in the civil case. “These accounts are suspicious,” U.S. District Judge George Wu said in a ruling last year. But he threw out most of the Justice Department’s case, concluding there “is no evidence that the defendant assets were purchased with those funds.” In December, the Justice Department filed a new civil suit against Mr. Obiang. Before the settlement was reached, the two sides were sparring over whether a statute of limitations had lapsed.”

McInerney to Davis Polk

As Chief of the DOJ’s Fraud Section and Deputy Assistant Attorney General for the Criminal Division, Denis McInerney was involved in setting DOJ FCPA policy during this declared new era of enforcement and frequently advanced those policy positions on the FCPA conference circuit.  McInerney recently left the DOJ and Davis Polk recently announced:

“McInerney … is returning to the firm as a partner in its Litigation Department and member of its white collar criminal defense and investigations practice.  As Chief of the Fraud Section (from 2010 to 2013) and then Deputy Assistant Attorney General overseeing the Fraud, Appellate and Capital Case Sections of the Criminal Division (from 2013 to 2014), Mr. McInerney was responsible for supervising approximately 100 prosecutors in the Fraud Section, which has responsibility for all Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) investigations conducted by DOJ, as well as a wide range of other complex white collar criminal investigations and prosecutions throughout the country, including corporate, securities, financial, health care and procurement fraud cases.

Among other matters, Mr. McInerney played a leadership role in DOJ’s investigations into the alleged manipulation of LIBOR and the foreign exchange market by various financial institutions around the world, and the preparation of A Resource Guide to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which was published by DOJ and the SEC in 2012.  Mr. McInerney’s tenure leading the Fraud Section was marked by a substantial increase in the number of defendants charged and convicted on an annual basis, as well as the number of trials conducted by Fraud Section prosecutors each year.

[...]

“We are delighted to welcome Denis back. His integrity, judgment and experience, both as a high-level DOJ official overseeing some of the nation’s most important white collar cases and as a skilled defense attorney representing institutions and individuals in their most sensitive investigations and trials, will be a great asset to our world-class litigation and white collar criminal defense teams,” said Thomas J. Reid, Davis Polk’s Managing Partner. “Denis rejoins an extraordinary and growing team of former government officials in our New York and Washington offices, including litigators who have held senior positions with DOJ, the SEC, the White House and the CIA.”

Mr. McInerney said, “I’m very grateful that I was given the opportunity to return to the Department for these last four plus years to help lead a terrific group of prosecutors at Main Justice in Washington. At the same time, I’m very glad to be home, not only with my family in New York, but with Davis Polk, a firm that is all about excellence, where I was fortunate to have practiced for 18 years. Returning to Davis Polk will give me the opportunity to work on some of the most important and interesting enforcement and regulatory matters in the country with an expanded and extremely talented litigation group.”

 Proof

Need further proof that it is indeed an FCPA world.  See here.

*****

A good weekend to all.

Friday Roundup

Friday, September 5th, 2014

Knox to FCPA Inc., DOJ response brief filed, SFO speeches, and asset recovery.  It’s all here in the Friday roundup.

Knox to FCPA Inc.

As highlighted in this prior post, over the summer Jeffrey Knox (DOJ Fraud Section Chief) followed the same tired script on a number of FCPA issues.  It will be interesting to hear / read of Knox’s positions in the future as – following a well-traveled career path for DOJ FCPA enforcement attorneys – he is leaving government service for the private sector to provide FCPA investigative and compliance services to business organizations subject to the current era of FCPA enforcement.  (See here from the Washington Post, here from the Wall Street Journal, and here from the New York Times).

Knox is headed to Simpson Thatcher (also home to former SEC FCPA Unit Chief Cheryl Scarboro – see here for the prior post). This Simpson Thatcher release states in pertinent part:

“Mr. Knox will be a partner based in the Firm’s Washington, D.C. office and a member of the Firm’s Government and Internal Investigations Practice. During his tenure at the DOJ, Mr. Knox served as the Chief and, before then, the second-ranking official of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section, which has responsibility for some of the nation’s most significant fraud cases, including … Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) criminal investigations and prosecutions in the United States.”

[...]

“We are pleased to welcome Jeff back to the Firm,” said Bill Dougherty, Chairman of Simpson Thacher’s Executive Committee. “His deep experience in overseeing high-stakes government investigations and enforcement actions will be a significant asset to our clients as they navigate an increasingly complex enforcement landscape.” “We are very excited that Jeff is joining our Government and Internal Investigations team here at Simpson Thacher. As Chief of the Fraud Section, Jeff has presided over many of the most significant financial fraud, healthcare fraud, and FCPA investigations in recent years, and we know that he is greatly respected within both the DOJ and the white collar bar. His experience and insight will provide substantial value to our clients,” added Mark J. Stein, Head of the Firm’s Government and Internal Investigations Practice.”

The release further states: “[Knox] was a contributor to the DOJ and SEC’s A Resource Guide to the FCPA, published in 2012.”

As I have done in all previous instances of high-ranking DOJ or SEC FCPA enforcement attorneys leaving government services for lucrative FCPA related jobs in the private sector (see here for instance), I will restate my position.

As to DOJ and SEC FCPA enforcement attorneys who have supervisory and discretionary positions and articulate government FCPA policies, it is in the public interest that such individuals be prohibited, upon leaving government service, from providing FCPA defense or compliance services in the private sector for a five-year period.

DOJ Response Brief Filed

This previous post highlighted the motion to dismiss filed by former Alstom executive Lawrence Hoskins in the criminal FCPA action against him.  In short, the motion to dismiss stated that the DOJ’s indictment “charges stale and time-barred conduct that occurred more than a decade ago; it asserts violations of U.S. law by a British citizen who never stepped foot on U.S. soil during the relevant time period; and, it distorts the definition of the time-worn legal concept of agency beyond recognition.”  As noted in the prior post, much of Hoskins’s brief focuses on the issue of whether he withdrew from the alleged criminal conspiracy involving alleged improper payments at the Tarahan power plant project in Indonesia.

Earlier this week, the DOJ filed this response brief.  In pertinent part, the DOJ’s brief states:

“The defendant seeks to have the Court take the extraordinary step of dismissing the Indictment against him at this pretrial phase based on his interpretation of the legal import of  certain allegations contained in the Indictment, supplemented by his own selective version of events contained in an affidavit attached to his motion. The Indictment, however, sets forth more than sufficient facts to support the charged crimes. Moreover, at trial the Government expects to present substantial additional evidence supporting the charges, including facts that bear directly on the arguments raised by the defendant in his motion. The defendant’s motion thus represents a novel effort to – in effect – invent and obtain summary judgment in the criminal process based on the claim that he has established the factual basis for his defenses. For good reason, the law provides that only after the Government has presented its case should a judge and jury grapple with the legal and factual sufficiency of that evidence. Thus, the defendant’s motion should be denied. Even addressing the merits of his arguments at this premature stage, however, the defendant’s motion should fail.

In particular, the defendant’s motion fails because: (1) the issue of withdrawal is necessarily a factual one to be decided by a jury and, nonetheless, the defendant did not withdraw from the charged conspiracies; (2) the Indictment has adequately alleged, and the Government will prove at trial, that the defendant was an “agent” of a domestic concern under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”), the charged conduct is domestic (not extraterritorial), and Congress has not specially excepted the defendant from prosecution under the FCPA and, thus, he can be liable for causing, aiding and abetting, or conspiring to commit an FCPA violation even if he is not guilty as a principal; and (3) the Indictment alleges continuing transactions (the bribe payments) that were initiated from Connecticut and alleges that the defendant aided and abetted the transactions through acts in Connecticut, and thus the money laundering charges are properly venued in the District of Connecticut.”

SFO Speeches

David Green’s (Director of the U.K. Serious Fraud Office) recent speech regarding a “cross-section of SFO cases” included the following in the foreign bribery space:

  • Barclays/Qatar: is an investigation, begun in 2012, into the circumstances surrounding Barclays’ £8bn recapitalisation in 2008.
  • Rolls Royce: concerns allegations of bribery carried out by local agents in return for orders in various markets, touching several divisions of Rolls Royce business activity.
  • GlaxoSmithKline: this is an investigation into allegations that bribes were paid in order to increase business in several jurisdictions.
  • GPT: this investigation concerns a subsidiary’s business relationship with the Saudi National Guard.
  • Alstom: this is an ongoing investigation into the use of British subsidiaries of a major French multinational to dispense bribes in several jurisdictions in order to secure large infrastructure contracts. Charges have already been laid against a subsidiary.
  • The Sweett Group: this investigation concerns allegations of bribes paid in return for building contracts in North Africa.

For another recent speech by Alun Milford (General Counsel of the SFO) on cooperation and disclosure, see here.

Asset Recovery

In news related to the DOJ’s Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Initiative (under which prosecutors in the DOJ Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Section work in partnership with federal law enforcement agencies to forfeit the proceeds of foreign official corruption – see this 2009 post highlighting Attorney General Holder’s announcement of the program), the DOJ announced:

“The Department of Justice has seized approximately $500,000 in assets traceable to corruption proceeds accumulated by Chun Doo Hwan, the former president of the Republic of Korea.   This seizure brings the total value of seized corruption proceeds of President Chun to more than $1.2 million.  [...] Chun Doo Hwan orchestrated a vast campaign of corruption while serving as Korea’s president,” said Assistant Attorney General Caldwell.   “President Chun amassed more than $200 million in bribes while in office, and he and his relatives systematically laundered these funds through a complex web of transactions in the United States and Korea.   Today’s seizure underscores how the Criminal Division’s Kleptocracy Initiative – working in close collaboration with our law enforcement partners across the globe – will use every available means to deny corrupt foreign officials and their relatives safe haven for their assets in the United States.”

*****

A good weekend to all.

 

Friday Roundup

Friday, August 1st, 2014

When the dust settles, scrutiny alerts and updates, quotable and for the reading stack.  It’s all here in the Friday roundup.

When the Dust Settles

Given the ease in which information now flows and the world-wide interest in corruption and bribery, FCPA enforcement actions are read around the world.  It is thus not surprising that when the dust settles on the U.S. FCPA enforcement action, many are left wondering … who are those “foreign officials”?

Most recent case in point concerns this week’s FCPA enforcement action against Smith & Wesson which involved alleged conduct in Indonesia, among other countries.  According to the SEC:

“In 2009, Smith & Wesson attempted to win a contract to sell firearms to a Indonesian police department by making improper payments to its third party agent in Indonesia, who indicated that part of the payment would be provided to the Indonesian police officials under the guise of legitimate firearm lab testing costs. On several occasions, Smith & Wesson’s third-party agent indicated that the Indonesian police expected Smith & Wesson to pay them additional amounts above the actual cost of testing the guns as an inducement to enter the contract. The agent later notified Smith & Wesson’s Regional Director of International Sales that the price of “testing” the guns had risen further. Smith & Wesson’s Vice President of International Sales and its Regional Director of International Sales authorized and made the inflated payment, but a deal was never consummated.”

As noted in this Jakarta Post article:

“The Indonesian Corruption Watch (ICW) has called for an investigation into an alleged attempt by US gunmaker Smith & Wesson to bribe officials at the National Police.  [...] In response to the SEC [action], ICW legal researcher Donal Fariz urged the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) to look into the scandal.  The National Police may face a conflict of interest by handling the case. So, it is better to entrust the investigation with the KPK. The KPK needs to ask for the detailed report [from the SEC] on the police officials who were involved in the scandal,” he said on Wednesday in a telephone interview”

Nominate

If FCPA Professor adds value to your practice or business or otherwise enlightens your day and causes you to contemplate the issues in a more sophisticated way, please consider nominating FCPA Professor for the ABA Journal’s Blawg 100 list (see here).

Scrutiny Alerts and Updates

Bloomberg reports here:

“British prosecutors told several former employees of Alstom SA that they’ll be charged as part of its prosecution of the French train-maker, according to two people with knowledge of the situation.The prosecutor contacted the individuals yesterday to offer to start plea discussions, the people said, asking not to be identified because the correspondence isn’t public. Some may appear with the company at a London court on Sept. 9, according to the people. The U.K. Serious Fraud Office charged Alstom’s U.K. subsidiary with corruption and conspiracy to corrupt yesterday following a five-year investigation. The company was charged in relation to transport projects in India, Poland and Tunisia, the agency said. The SFO contacted at least five individuals about two months ago inviting them for plea discussions, people with knowledge of the matter said in June. The SFO then decided to postpone the talks until it decided whether to prosecute Alstom.”

Bloomberg reports here:

“Wynn Resorts said it has been contacted by Macau’s anti-corruption agency regarding the company’s land purchase for its new resort-casino on the Cotai Strip. “We are working cooperatively with” the city’s Commission Against Corruption, the Las Vegas-based company said in an e-mailed reply to questions yesterday. The Macau Business newspaper reported July 11 that the agency is investigating why Wynn Resorts was made to pay 400 million patacas ($50 million) for the land rights, citing Commission Chief Fong Man Chon.  Wynn Resorts had to buy the rights from certain mainlanders, though the Land Public Works and Transport Bureau said it wasn’t aware of their involvement, according to the Macau Business report.”

As highlighted in this February 2012 e-mail, Wynn Resorts was under FCPA scrutiny for its $135 million donation to the University of Macau. See here for an update based on the company’s disclosures.

Quotable

Thomas Baxter (Executive Vice President and General Counsel of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York) stated, in pertinent part, as follows in a recent speech:

“[T]here is one part of the FCPA that makes me uncomfortable.  The FCPA’s bribery prohibition, and the compliance officers in the audience will know this well, contains a narrow exception for “facilitating or expediting payments” made in furtherance of routine governmental action.  [...]  The real mischief is what this exception might do to an organizational value system.  When an organizational policy allows some types of official corruption (and we have come up with candy coated names for this, like facilitation or expediting payments), this diminishes the efficacy of compliance rules that are directed toward stopping official corruption.  Again, the best compliance cultures are formed when the rules and the organizational value system are in perfect harmony.  So, for U.S. chartered institutions, perhaps this is a place where your organizational value system should go beyond black-letter U.S. law.  If you tolerate a little corruption, watch out!”

I generally agree and as highlighted in this recent post when it comes to employee FCPA training, companies should consider omitting reference to the FCPA’s facilitating payments exception and affirmative defenses.  The Global Anti-Bribery Course I have developed in partnership with Emtrain best assists companies in reducing their overall risk exposure by omitting reference to the FCPA’s facilitating payments exception and affirmative defenses in rank-and-file employee training.

To learn more about the course, see here.

To read what others are saying about the course, see here.

Michael Volkov at the Corruption, Crime & Compliance site often tells-it-like-it-is and this post begins as follows.

“The Internet is littered with FCPA Mid-Year Assessments and reports on enforcement activity and so-called trends and developments. Talk about making mountains out of molehills. Some of the reports are excellent; others are rehashes filled with “analysis” that are intended to promote FCPA fear marketing.”

Reading Stack

This recent article in the Corporate Law & Accountability Report details comments made by SEC FCPA Unit Chief Kara Brockmeyer.  In the article Brockmeyer talks about:

  • SEC administrative proceedings;
  • the 11th Circuit’s recent “foreign official” decision; the recent conclusion of the SEC’s enforcement action against Mark Jackson and James Ruehlen which she called “a very good settlement for us”;
  • the origins of SEC FCPA inquiries; and
  • holistic compliance and typical risk areas.