Archive for the ‘Canada’ Category

Mid-Year Review Of Anti-Corruption Law North Of The 49th Parallel

Thursday, August 27th, 2015

CanadaA guest post  from Mark Morrison (Blake, Cassels & Graydon) the Canada Expert for FCPA Professor, and Blakes attorneys Michael Dixon and James Reid.


This year, Canada has been actively implementing laws aimed at a holistic approach to the fight against corruption. This post discusses some of the new legislation effected by the Canadian Government to compliment Canada’s equivalent of the FCPA, the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act (CFPOA), as well as some of the recent enforcement proceedings taking place in Canada so far this year.

New Anti-Corruption Laws

The Integrity Regime – On July 3, 2015, the Government’s principal contracting arm, Public Works and Government Services Canada,  announced the implementation of a new government-wide Integrity Regime for all federal government procurement. The new Regime replaced the Integrity Framework, which was heavily criticized as being unfairly harsh for its lack of due process and failure to account for remedial actions taken by companies subject  to its application. The new Regime has provided some flexibility to ameliorate some of the harshest aspects of the Framework.

Under the Integrity Regime, a supplier is barred from doing business with the Government of Canada for 10 years if it or any board members have been convicted or discharged in the past three years for a range of integrity-related offences in Canada or abroad, including bribery, fraud, bid-rigging, tax evasion, insider trading and money laundering. However, the decade long ban can be cut in half if the supplier shows it has taken action to co-operate with authorities, takes remedial action and enters into an administrative agreement with the Government. While the new regime amounts to a retreat from the integrity rules enacted just last March, in which any prior conviction against a supplier or any of its international affiliates would have earned a 10-year ban with no chance of its reduction, the automatic debarment penalty remains–unlike the U.S. equivalent integrity provisions.

In addition, arguably the most significant improvement to the former Integrity Framework, is that the new Regime eliminates mandatory ineligibility of a supplier for the actions of an affiliate (including a parent company) unless there is evidence that the supplier/potential supplier had involvement in the wrongdoing that led to the conviction of its affiliate.

The Extractive Sector Transparency Measures Act (ESTMA) – ESTMA is Canada’s latest step in the global fight against corruption. The ESTMA, which came into force on June 1, 2015, is designed to complement Canada’s existing anti-corruption regime in the CFPOA by creating greater transparency over payments to a government by the extractive sector. ESTMA’s reporting requirements apply to companies engaged in the development of oil, gas or minerals that are either (a) listed on a Canadian stock exchange or (b) have a place of business in Canada, do business in Canada or have assets in Canada, and which meet certain size thresholds.

Companies subject to the ESTMA are required to report and publically disclose all payments, including taxes, royalties, fees and any other consideration for licenses, permits or concessions in excess of CAD$100,000. The Government has recently published draft guidelines and reporting specifications for public comment. The ESTMA will apply to payments to certain aboriginal governments, subject to a two-year transitional period. Non-compliance with the reporting requirements is an offence. Any director or officer who directed, authorized, assented to, acquiesced in or participated in the non-compliance can also be held personally liable. These offences are subject to a maximum fine of CAD$250,000 for each day that the non-compliance continues.

Recent Enforcement Proceedings

Canadian anti-corruption enforcement has increased from 2014, which did not see any penalties imposed on corporate defendants under the CFPOA. The lack of enforcement in 2014 may have been reflective of the considerable resources and attention that was dedicated by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to the high profile investigation of Canada’s largest construction and engineering firm.

SNC Lavalin In February of this year, the RCMP laid corporate corruption and fraud charges against the Quebec based construction and engineering companies of the  SNC Lavalin Group, which stems from the Group’s dealings in Libya between 2001 and 2011. The RCMP investigation has also lead to criminal charges against several former SNC executives.

SNC maintains that any wrongdoing was the act of rogue individuals no longer employed by the company, and has entered a plea of not guilty. Unlike in the United States, Canada does not currently have deferred prosecution agreements, civil settlements, or other formal resolution procedures available outside of a criminal guilty plea. No preliminary hearing dates have been set in relation to the corruption charges against SNC.

In addition, to the Libya allegations, former SNC executives have also been charged in connection with an alleged bribery scandal related to a $1.3 billion hospital project in Montreal, where it has been alleged that former SNC executives funneled money to ex-McGill hospital officials in exchange for the contract. A three week preliminary hearing, which is protected by a publication ban, heard testimony from about 16 people this past March.  No decision on committal for trial has yet been issued.

MagIndustries – The RCMP has obtained a search warrant and is investigating allegations from a whistleblowing accountant at MagIndustries Corporation, that bribes were paid to officials in the Republic of Congo to win approvals tied to a potash mine development. The RCMP believe four top executives with the company, including the CEO, ignored warnings from Canadian financial advisers and signed off on a string of illegal payments to Congolese officials. None of the allegations contained in the search warrant have been tested in court, and the RCMP has not laid any charges to date.

Canadian Senate Expenses Scandal – dominating Canadian media headlines since the recent announcement of the October Federal Election, is the ongoing political scandal concerning the expense claims of certain Canadian senators which began in late 2012. Senators Patrick Brazeau, Mike Duffy, Mac Harb, and Pamela Wallin claimed travel and living allowance expenses which were ineligible. Brazeau, Duffy, and Harb were criminally charged with one count each of fraud and breach of trust. As a result, the Auditor General of Canada examined expense claims made by all the other 116 senators and former senators over a two-year period. In the June 2015 report of the Auditor General, the Auditor General identified thirty senators whose claims were ineligible, and of these, recommended that nine cases be referred for police investigation.


Canada continues to focus on anti-corruption compliance and enforcement by bolstering the legislative tools available to law enforcement and government agencies. Onlookers are intently watching what will come from the high profile cases against SNC and the Canadian senators. As things are looking now, the remainder of 2015 is shaping up to be one of the most active years in Canadian anti-corruption enforcement history.

Canadian Government Overhauls the Integrity Regime for Suppliers – Still Tough to Get Over Debar

Monday, July 13th, 2015

CanadaToday’s post is from Milos Barutciski and Matthew Kronby (partners with Bennett Jones in Toronto).

It was originally published as a Bennett Jones Client Alert and is reposted below with permission.



On July 3, the Government of Canada announced a new Integrity Regime to replace the previous rules for debarment (disqualification) from public procurement. The new Regime, which is effective immediately, responds to more than a year of steady criticism of the previous Integrity Framework first established in 2010 by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), the principal procuring arm of the Canadian federal government. That criticism, from business, legal and anti-corruption organizations, argued that the Integrity Framework had become so inflexible, punitive and far-reaching that it would be counterproductive to its objectives, namely to deter criminal misconduct and protect the integrity of the public procurement process. Commentators argued that the actual effect of the old Integrity Framework was to make it difficult for the government to find “clean” suppliers and to discourage companies from acknowledging and remediating wrongdoing.

The Government signaled its intention to address these concerns in its April 2015 budget. The new Integrity Regime goes a considerable distance to correct many of the problems with the Integrity Framework, but falls short in some critical respects.

The Concerns Giving Rise to the New Integrity Regime

Under the former Integrity Framework, suppliers faced disqualification from PWGSC procurements for fraud or corruption offences they or their affiliates have committed. The definition of “affiliates”, which appears to have been drawn from the U.S. debarment rules, is very broad; it covers all relationships where one entity has the power to control the other or a third party has the power to control both. In 2012, the list of offences that could give rise to debarment was expanded to include the bribery of foreign public officials under the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act and other federal offences.

None of this provoked particular concern until March 2014, when PWGSC adopted the latest in a series of “get tough” amendments to the Integrity Framework. One of these amendments imposed a mandatory 10-year ineligibility period for suppliers, with no scope for reduction due either to the gravity of the offending conduct or the remediation efforts of the business involved. In contrast with the U.S. and similar regimes elsewhere, which give credit for mitigating circumstances and remediation efforts in determining or subsequently reducing debarment penalties, companies doing significant business with the Canadian government have had little incentive to admit to and redress corrupt conduct and potentially a strong disincentive to do so.

The 2014 amendments also expanded the ineligibility conditions to include foreign offences “similar” to the listed domestic offences. Since the Integrity Framework already extended to the conduct of far-flung affiliates, this meant that Canadian businesses could face automatic 10-year debarments from most federal procurement not only for their own corrupt conduct but for the foreign conduct of remotely related entities over which they exercised no oversight or control. Increasing international enforcement of regulatory laws, such as anti-corruption, economic sanctions, antitrust and competition offences, meant that Canadian companies could face automatic debarment in ever expanding circumstances with no connection to Canada.

Key Elements of the New Integrity Regime

The new Integrity Regime remains under the primary authority of PWGSC and its Minister. The elements of the Regime are set out in a new PWGSC Ineligibility and Suspension Policy. The new Regime introduces key changes in relation to (i) the potential to reduce the length of debarment through remediation in certain circumstances; (ii) interim debarment prior to conviction; (iii) the consequences of “affiliate” conduct, (iv) the impact of conviction for foreign offences, and (v) new administrative and review process within PWGSC.

Potential Reduction of 10-year Debarment

The Regime maintains the 10-year ineligibility period for participation in procurements, which will apply for any convictions for covered offences within the previous three years. However, suppliers, other than those convicted of fraudulent conduct in a government procurement, will have the opportunity to reduce their ineligibility by up to five years by co-operating with law enforcement authorities or implementing appropriate remediation to address the causes of the misconduct. To restore their eligibility, suppliers also will need to obtain independent third-party certification that they have successfully addressed the causes of the misconduct. Suppliers convicted of fraud in connection with Canadian government procurement will remain ineligible indefinitely until they have received a pardon.

Ineligibility extends to sub-contractors as well. Suppliers who without prior Ministerial approval perform government contracts using sub-contractors deemed ineligible under the Integrity Regime will themselves face five-year debarments.

Interim Debarment

In addition to the 10-year ineligibility period, suppliers that have been charged with or admitted to any of the covered offences may be suspended from participating in procurement processes pending completion of the criminal proceedings.

PWGSC will maintain a list of ineligible and suspended companies and individuals.


The actions of an affiliate no longer render the supplier automatically ineligible. Instead, a supplier will be ineligible for the conduct of an affiliate only where the supplier can be shown to have “directed, influenced, authorized, assented to, acquiesced in or participated in” the conduct that would give rise to ineligibility. The Integrity Regime also establishes a review process under which suppliers will have 30 days to contest determinations of ineligibility based on the conduct of affiliates.

Foreign Offences

“Similar” foreign offences remain a basis for ineligibility or suspension under the Integrity Regime. The regime now explicitly contemplates an assessment of that similarity as well as the fairness and legitimacy of the proceedings that produced the foreign conviction. However, it is unclear who will be charged with making those assessments; the Ineligibility and Suspension Policy contemplates suppliers hiring independent third parties to provide information about foreign conviction but states rather vaguely that the “opinion of Canada” will be determinative.

Administrative Process

As under the Integrity Framework, the Government will be able to enter into a contract with an otherwise ineligible supplier where doing so is deemed necessary to the public interest, such as where no other suppliers can perform the contract or where failure to enter into the contract would pose risks to national security or public health.

The Regime contemplates the use of administrative agreements imposing conditions and compliance measures that an ineligible supplier must take to have its 10-year ineligibility period reduced or suspension following charges lifted, or when the Government invokes the public interest exemption or maintains an existing contract with a supplier who has become non-compliant. Supplier compliance with these agreements will be subject to independent third-party monitoring.

Impact Assessment

The new Integrity Regime addresses the overreach and potential unfairness that were inherent in the Integrity Framework’s application to foreign convictions of supplier affiliates. More generally, it adds transparency to the process by which ineligibility decisions will be made.

The elimination of automatic 10-year ineligibility is also a welcome development as it, to some degree, recognizes and encourages cooperation and remediation efforts by suppliers who have committed listed offences.

However, the revised policy fails to make a clear distinction between punishment and deterrence of misconduct (the domain of criminal law) and protecting the integrity of federal procurement and taxpayer dollars (the domain of procurement rules). The growing severity of corporate fines and the risk of individual imprisonment in corporate criminal cases, together with the reputational harm suffered by companies found guilty of white collar crimes, are a very strong deterrent for repeat offences and a general deterrent for other companies. It is unlikely that an automatic five-year debarment from Canadian public procurement will contribute significantly further to deterrence. It will, however, have a detrimental impact on Canadian companies (and their employees) even when they have substantially overhauled their management and practices. The automatic debarment will also harm Canadian taxpayers by eliminating potential suppliers and reducing the number of competitors bidding on public contracts (with the consequential pricing impact of reduced competition).

PWGSC’s claim that the new Regime will encourage suppliers to proactively disclose misconduct seems similarly misguided. Unlike the U.S., which can offer deferred or non-prosecution agreements to enable companies that voluntarily confess their sins to avoid debarment, the only benefit the Regime will offer such companies is that their ineligibility period can begin sooner. Those companies will still face a minimum ineligibility period of five years, more than long enough to have serious or even existential consequences if they are heavily dependent on federal procurement contracts. Companies facing legal exposure in Canada or abroad that include potential ineligibility under the Integrity Regime therefore will want to consider their options carefully, with the assistance of expert legal counsel.

SNC-Lavalin Should Be Grateful And Not Pout

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

Child CryingBut Mom / Dad, when Johnny gets into trouble his parents do things a little bit differently, why can’t I benefit from that?

As I told The Globe and Mail in this article, that is my reaction to SNC-Lavalin’s unusual statement upon being criminally charged by Canadian authorities for alleged improper payments to Libyan officials.

As noted in this previous post, last week the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) announced charges against the SNC-Lavalin Group Inc., its division SNC-Lavalin Construction Inc. and its subsidiary SNC-Lavalin International Inc.

Upon being charged, SNC-Lavalin issued this release, which as relevant here, stated:

“It is important to note that companies in other jurisdictions, such as the United States and United Kingdom, benefit from a different approach that has been effectively used in the public interest to resolve similar matters while balancing accountability and securing the employment, economic and other benefits of businesses.”

SNC-Lavalin should be grateful about various aspects of Canada’s legal system (compared to the U.S.) and not pout.

For starters SNC-Lavalin can only be found guilty of the charges alleged to the extent one of its “senior officials” engaged in improper conduct.  This is a much more exacting standard than the very lenient U.S. standard of respondeat superior corporate criminal liability in which a business organization can face criminal liability to the extent any employee engaged in improper conduct within the scope of employment and intended, at least in part, to benefit the organization.

Perhaps most importantly, SNC-Lavalin should be grateful, and not pout, that Canadian authorities will have to prove the facts and legal theories alleged in the enforcement action.  In the U.S., FCPA enforcement agencies are rarely put in the position of having to prove anything in a corporate FCPA enforcement action.  Rather, the DOJ (or SEC) occupy the position of prosecutor, judge and jury all at the same time and use resolution vehicles such as non-prosecution and deferred prosecution agreements (NPAs / DPAs) or administrative settlements – all of which are not subjected to any meaningful judicial scrutiny.

In short, SNC-Lavalin should be grateful, and not pout, that Canadian law enforcement authorities have not abandoned (as U.S. authorities have) traditional legal principles in the name of ease and efficiency. Accusing a person – whether a natural person or a legal person such as SNC-Lavalin – was never meant to be easy or efficient and it is interesting that SNC-Lavalin appears to be begging for such a system.

In other portions of its recent statement, SNC-Lavalin stated that the criminal charges “are without merit.” In other words, SNC-Lavalin seems to be saying that even though the criminal charges “are without merit,” it would have gladly forked over tens of millions – or perhaps hundreds of millions of dollars – of shareholder money to make the RCMP go away.  How would that benefit SNC-Lavalin’s employees and shareholders?

It is also worth nothing that SNC-Lavalin’s statement casts several opinion statements as fact.

For instance, many would disagree that companies subject to the FCPA “benefit” from the common enforcement approach in which the DOJ (or SEC) are not put in a position to prove anything in relation to the facts and legal theories alleged.  Many would also disagree that companies subject to the FCPA “benefit” from the excessive leverage the DOJ (or SEC) have over companies in extracting corporate settlement.  Moreover, many would disagree that the U.S. approach to resolving corporate FCPA enforcement actions through NPAs and DPAs or administrative SEC actions have “been effectively used in the public interest.”

In short, SNC-Lavalin should be grateful, and not pout, that it is subject to a legal system in which law enforcement has to prove facts and legal theories to someone other than itself.

And let’s face it, the problem with SNC-Lavalin’s predicament has little to do with Canada’s legal regime for prosecuting companies, but rather Canada’s recent – and foolish – automatic debarment rules (see here and here).

Friday Roundup

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Roundup2Wal-Mart related, north of the border, scrutiny alerts and updates, and an issue to watch.

It’s all here in the Friday roundup.

Wal-Mart Related

Here is what Wal-Mart said in its recent 4Q FY2015 earnings call.

“FCPA-and compliance-related costs were $36 million in the fourth quarter, comprised of $26 million for the ongoing inquiries and investigations, and $10 million for our global compliance program and organizational enhancements. For the full year, FCPA-and compliance related costs were $173 million, comprised of $121 million for the ongoing inquiries and investigations, and $52 million for our global compliance program and organizational enhancements. Last year, total FCPA-and compliance-related costs were $282 million.”

“In fiscal 2016, we expect our FCPA-related expenses to range between $160 and $180 million.”

Doing the math, Wal-Mart’s 4Q FCPA and compliance-related costs is approximately $563,000 in FCPA-related expenses per working day.

Over the past approximate three years, I have tracked Wal-Mart’s quarterly disclosed pre-enforcement action professional fees and expenses. While some pundits have ridiculed me for doing so, such figures are notable because, as has been noted in prior posts and in my article “Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Ripples,” settlement amounts in an actual FCPA enforcement action are often only a relatively minor component of the overall financial consequences that can result from corporate FCPA scrutiny.  Pre-enforcement action professional fees and expenses are typically the largest (in many cases to a degree of 3, 5, 10 or higher than settlement amounts) financial hit to a company under FCPA scrutiny.

While $563,000 per working day remains eye-popping, Wal-Mart’s recent figure suggests that the company’s pre-enforcement action professional fees and expenses have crested as the figures for the past five quarters have been approximately $640,000, $662,000, $855,000, $1.1 million and $1.3 million per working day.

In the aggregate, Wal-Mart’s disclosed pre-enforcement professional fees and expenses are as follows.

FY 2013 = $157 million.

FY 2014 = $282 million.

FY 2015  = $173 million.

FY 2016 = $160 – $180 million (projected)

North of the Border

Yesterday, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) announced charges against the SNC-Lavalin Group Inc., its division SNC-Lavalin Construction Inc. and its subsidiary SNC-Lavalin International Inc.”  As stated in the release:

“The three entities have been charged with one count of corruption under paragraph 3(1)(b) of the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act and one count of fraud under paragraph 380(1)(a) of the Criminal Code.The alleged criminal acts surfaced as part of the ongoing criminal investigation into the company’s business dealings in Lybia.

The charges laid are the following:

In Montreal, Judicial District of Montreal, elsewhere in Canada and abroad

  1. Between on or about August 16, 2001 and on or about September 20, 2011, the SNC-Lavalin Group Inc., its division SNC-Lavalin Construction Inc. and its subsidiary SNC-Lavalin International Inc., did, in order to obtain or retain an advantage in the course of business, directly or indirectly give, offer or agree to give or offer a loan, reward, advantage or benefit of any kind of a value of CAN$47,689,868 or more, to one or several public officials of the “Great Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya” or to any person for the benefit of a public official of the “Great Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya”, to induce these officials to use their positions to influence any acts or decisions of the “Great Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya” for which they perform their duties or functions, thereby committing an indictable offence contrary to paragraph 3(1)(b) of the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act.
  2. Between on or about August 16, 2001 and on or about September 20, 2011, the SNC-Lavalin Group Inc., its division SNC-Lavalin Construction Inc. and its subsidiary SNC-Lavalin International Inc. did, by deceit, falsehood or other fraudulent means, whether or not it is a false pretense within the meaning of theCriminal Code, defraud the “Great Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya”, the “Management and Implementation Authority of the Great Man Made River Project” of Libya, the “General People’s Committee for Transport Civil Aviation Authority” of Libya, Lican Drilling Co Ltd, and the “Organization for Development of Administrative Centers” of Benghazi in Libya of property, money or valuable security or service of a value of approximately CAN$129,832,830, thereby committing an indictable offence contrary to paragraph 380(1)(a) of the Criminal Code.”

In the release, Assistant Commissioner Gilles Michaud, Commanding Officer of the RCMP’s National Division, stated: “Corruption of foreign officials undermines good governance and sustainable economic development. The charges laid today demonstrate how the RCMP continues to support Canada’s international commitments and safeguard its integrity and reputation.”

Upon being charged, SNC-Lavalin issued this release which states in full as follows.

“SNC-Lavalin was informed that federal charges have been laid by the Public Prosecution Service of Canada against SNC-Lavalin Group Inc., SNC-Lavalin International Inc. and SNC-Lavalin Construction Inc. Each entity has been charged with one count of fraud under section 380 of the Criminal Code of Canada and one count of corruption under Section 3(1)(b) of the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act. SNC-Lavalin firmly considers that the charges are without merit and will vigorously defend itself and plead not guilty in the interest of its current employees, families, partners, clients, investors and other stakeholders.

“The charges stem from the same alleged activities of former employees from over three years ago in Libya, which are publicly known, and that the company has cooperated on with authorities since then,” stated Robert G. Card, President and CEO, SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. “Even though SNC-Lavalin has already incurred significant financial damage and losses as a result of actions taken prior to March 2012, we have always been and remain willing to reach a reasonable and fair solution that promotes accountability, while permitting us to continue to do business and protect the livelihood of our over 40,000 employees, our clients, our investors and our other stakeholders.”

It is important to note that companies in other jurisdictions, such as the United States and United Kingdom, benefit from a different approach that has been effectively used in the public interest to resolve similar matters while balancing accountability and securing the employment, economic and other benefits of businesses.

These charges relate to alleged reprehensible deeds by former employees who left the company long ago. If charges are appropriate, we believe that they would be correctly applied against the individuals in question and not the company. The company has and will continue to fully cooperate with authorities to ensure that any individuals who are believed to have committed illegal acts are brought to justice. The company will also consider claims against these individuals to recover any damages the company has suffered as a result.

While the Public Prosecution Service of Canada and the RCMP have selected this as the next formal step in this 3-year old investigation, there is no change to the company’s right and ability to bid or work on any public or private projects.

Becoming a benchmark in ethics and compliance

Over the past three years, we have made significant changes to the company and remained focused on continuous improvements in ethics and compliance. The tone from the top is clear and unequivocal; there is zero tolerance for ethics violations. The individuals alleged to have been involved in past ethical issues are no longer with the company, and a new CEO has changed the face of the executive team. Under the leadership of the Board of Directors, the company has reinforced its Ethics and Compliance program with huge investments in time and money to rapidly make significant and concrete enhancements, including:

  • Creating the position of Chief Compliance Officer, who reports to the board, and hiring world-renowned leaders in compliance
  • Appointing an Independent Monitor recommended by and who reports solely to, the World Bank Group
  • Appointing compliance officers in all of the company’s business units and regional offices worldwide
  • Creating a dedicated Ethics and Compliance team
  • Further reinforcing internal controls and procedures
  • Further reinforcing its Code of Ethics and Ethics and Compliance Hotline
  • Producing a dedicated  Anti-Corruption Manual
  • Offering annual compliance training to all employees, with a special focus on those working in strategic roles
  • Developing and distributing a world-class Business Partners Policy to employees
  • Using an independent third party to screen candidates for senior management positions
Working hard to build a global leader in the engineering and construction industry

Over the past 3 years and while managing issues created by events prior to 2012, we have worked hard to develop and implement a strategy to become a global Tier-1 player and take our place in a consolidating industry. We have taken concrete steps towards a 5-year goal of doubling our size, and we continue to deliver on our strategy. A clear example is the acquisition of Kentz that added 15,000 employees to our oil and gas business, making us a Tier-1 player in this area.

Since 1911, SNC-Lavalin employees have been working with our clients to create world-class projects that improve people’s quality of life and provide value to our clients. We are the only Canadian player among the top engineering and construction firms in the world, ranking as the number one firm in both Canada and Quebec.

“I would like to thank our more than 40,000 employees, clients, shareholders, partners and other stakeholders for their trust and continuing support,” concluded Mr. Card.”

The portion of SNC-Lavalin’s statement highlighted above in bold and underlined is most interesting.

Scrutiny Alerts and Updates


In 2008, Flowserve Corporation and a related entity agreed to pay approximately $10.5 million to resolve DOJ and SEC FCPA enforcement actions concerning conduct in connection with the U.N. Oil for Food Program in Iraq.  As part of the SEC resolution, Flowserve agreed to final judgment permanently enjoining it from future violations of FCPA’s books and records and internal controls provisions.

Earlier this week, Flowserve disclosed as follows.

“The Company has uncovered actions involving an employee based in an overseas subsidiary that violated our Code of Business Conduct and may have violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The Company has terminated the employee, is in the process of completing an internal investigation, and has self-reported the potential violation to the United States Department of Justice and the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. While the Company does not currently believe that this matter will have a material adverse impact on its business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows, there can be no assurance that the Company will not be subjected to monetary penalties and additional costs.”

Eli Lilly

In December 2012, Eli Lilly agreed to pay $29 million to resolve an SEC FCPA enforcement action based on subsidiary conduct in China, Brazil, Poland, and Russia.  At the time, there was no parallel DOJ action which sent a signal to knowledgeable observers that there would likely not be a parallel DOJ action.

Earlier this week, Eli Lilly made this official when it disclosed:

“In August 2003, we received notice that the staff of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) was conducting an investigation into the compliance by Lilly’s Polish subsidiary with the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977 (FCPA). Subsequently, we were notified that the SEC had expanded its investigation to other countries and that the Department of Justice (DOJ) was conducting a parallel investigation. In December 2012, we announced that we had reached an agreement with the SEC to settle its investigation. The settlement relates to certain activities of Lilly subsidiaries in Brazil, China, Poland, and Russia from 1994 through 2009. Without admitting or denying the allegations, we consented to pay a civil settlement amount of $29.4 million and agreed to have an independent compliance consultant conduct a 60-day review of our internal controls and compliance program related to the FCPA. In January 2015, the DOJ advised us that they have closed their investigation into this matter.”


As highlighted here, allegations have surfaced that Rolls-Royce “paid bribes for a contract with Brazilian oil firm Petrobras.” According to the report, “one of the Petrobras informants in the case, received at least $200,000 in bribes from Rolls-Royce, which makes gas turbines for Petrobras oil platforms.”

As noted in the report, “Britain’s Serious Fraud Office is separately investigating Rolls-Royce because of concerns over possible bribery in Indonesia and China.”

As highlighted here and here Rolls-Royce is also under investigation in the U.S. by the DOJ and in 2012 Data Systems & Solutions, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of  Rolls-Royce Holdings, resolved an FCPA enforcement action.

U.K. Sentences

The U.K. Serious Fraud Office recently announced that “two employees of Smith and Ouzman Ltd, a printing company based in Eastbourne, were sentenced … following an SFO investigation into corrupt payments made in return for the award of contracts to the company.” As noted in the release:

Smith and Ouzman Ltd specialises in security documents such as ballot papers and education certificates.  Its chairman, Christopher John Smith, aged 72 from East Sussex, was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment, suspended for two years, for two counts of corruptly agreeing to make payments, contrary to section 1(1) of the Prevention of Corruption Act 1906, to run concurrently. He was also ordered to carry out 250 hours of unpaid work and has been given a three month curfew.

Nicholas Charles Smith, the sales and marketing director of the company, aged 43 from East Sussex, was sentenced to three years’ imprisonment for three counts of corruptly agreeing to make payments, to run concurrently. The company itself was also convicted of the same three offences and will be sentenced at a later date.

Both men were disqualified from acting as company directors for six years.

Director of the SFO, David Green CB QC commented:

“This case marks the first convictions secured against a corporate for foreign bribery, following a contested trial. The convictions recognise the corrosive impact of such conduct on growth and the integrity of business contracts in the Developing World.”

In passing sentence HHJ Higgins commented:

“Your behaviour was cynical, deplorable and deeply antisocial, suggesting moral turpitude.”

The published in full the Judge’s sentencing remarks.

Issue to Watch

This Wall Street Journal editorial was about Apple’s battle with its corporate monitor in an antitrust action.  While outside the FCPA context, the editorial nevertheless notes:

“Apple might have settled long ago as most corporations do, and that option might even have been cheaper than a protracted appeal. But the company is doing a public service by attempting to vindicate a legal principle and brake the growing abuse of court-appointed monitors and a crank theory of antitrust that will harm many more innovators if it is allowed to stand. If Apple prevails in the Second Circuit, it ought to sue Mr. Bromwich and attempt to disgorge the $2.65 million he has soaked from shareholders.”


A good weekend to all.

Friday Roundup

Friday, February 6th, 2015

Roundup2Quotable, on offense, scrutiny alert, to FCPA Inc., and resource alert.  It’s all here in the Friday roundup.


This article in The Recorder reports on a recent public event in which Assistant Attorney General Leslie Caldwell spoke.  According to the article:

“Caldwell also said the Criminal Division would cut down on its use of deferred prosecution agreements, which she said had become the ‘default’ means to resolve corporate cases. ‘Deferred prosecution agreements were a bit overused.’ Instead, Caldwell told the audience to expect more declinations from the government, which would let companies, individual targets and the public know when an investigation is being closed without charges.”

Glad to see that Caldwell agrees that DPAs have become a default means to resolve cases and overused –  central themes of my 2010 article “The Facade of FCPA Enforcement” and my 2010 Senate FCPA testimony.

On Offense

This prior post highlighted Canada’s 2013 enforcement action against Griffiths Energy International Inc. (“GEI”) under Canada’s Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act (“CFPOA”) for allegedly bribing Chad’s Ambassador to Canada, Mahamoud Adam Bechir and his wife Ms. Nouracham Niam.

According to this recent article in the Calgary Sun Bechir and Niam are going on offense.  The article notes:

“The former Chadian ambassador to Canada and his wife have launched a $150-million lawsuit claiming “false” bribery allegations against them have sullied their reputation. Mahamoud Adam Bechir and his spouse, Nouracham Niam, are suing law firm Gowlings Lafleur Henderson LLP, partner Kristine Robidoux and the current corporate owner of Griffiths Energy International (GEI) Inc. In a statement of claim filed in Calgary Court of Queen’s Bench the couple say claims by Griffiths it paid a $2-million bribe to the wife’s company were untrue.”

Scrutiny Alert

Staying north of the border, as noted in this report,

“MagIndustries Corp., a China-backed Canadian potash company, said it has formed a special committee to look into allegations some of its officers and employees have breached the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act. Canadian police visited the company’s head office in Toronto with a search warrant on Jan. 22 in connection with the allegation, MagIndustries said Thursday in a statement. “No charges have been laid in connection with this investigation and MagIndustries has no knowledge of any such breach and will be cooperating fully with the authorities,” the company said. MagIndustries, controlled by Evergreen Resources Holdings Ltd. according to data compiled by Bloomberg, is developing the Mengo potash mine in Republic of Congo.”

To FCPA Inc.

It happens so often it is difficult to keep track of, but I try my best.

In the latest example of a DOJ FCPA enforcement attorney departing for FCPA Inc. Ropes & Gray announced that “Ryan Rohlfsen, senior trial attorney at the U.S. Department of Justice’s Criminal Division, Fraud Section” who was as “part of an elite group of federal prosecutors responsible for the global enforcement of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA)” has joined the firm as a partner.

Resource Alert

My former law firm, Foley & Lardner, recently announced “Foley Global Risk Solutions.”  As stated in the release:

“Foley & Lardner LLP announced today the launch of Foley Global Risk Solutions – a new cost-effective service offering designed to help companies operating overseas comply with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). Foley GRS is an innovative, web-based service offering that provides businesses with a fully integrated FCPA compliance solution. The product, which relies on cutting-edge technology, will be offered for a fixed annual subscription fee. [...] Foley GRS is the first-of-its-kind integrated legal services solution using a technology-based platform that delivers a comprehensive, closed-loop program that includes risk assessments, current and periodically updated policies and procedures, training for employees, regular communications, and most importantly, access to legal advice and counseling on FCPA issues that arise during the course of business operations.”


A good weekend to all.